Tags

, , , , ,

LIONS CENTER DOMINIC RAIOLA TRAVELS LIKE A ROCKSTAR – klamb21@gmail.com

Credit Detroit Lions

While front row tickets and backstage passes may satisfy the average rockers dream concert, Lions 6-foot-1 center Dominic Raiola took the phrase “living the dream” one step further and raised it with a “what’s up what’s up?”, boarding Kid Rock’s private jet on their way to his performance in St. Louis.

“It was the best show I’ve ever been to,” Raiola Said. “We flew to St. Louis and back, it was alright.”

Born in Honolulu, the Saint Louis High School prep star was undefeated in his final three years of high school before shipping off to the University of Nebraska.

“Eminem and Kid Rock are my favorite Detroit artists,” Raiola told Sportz Detroit Magazine. “I dig old school jams, Dr. Dre, Drake and Jay Z.”

In his first year as a cornhusker Raiola became the first freshman offensive lineman to start a game for the Cornhuskers since Rob Zatechka in 1991.

In 1999 he became the first sophomore center at Nebraska since Dave Rimington to participate in a postseason play and set a school record for knockdowns, which he broke again in 2000.

Raiola was recognized as a consensus first-team-All-American and won the Rimington Trophy in 2000, given to the best center in college football.

Given the opportunity to meet any artist, living or dead, the 2001 second round pick acknowledged one of the greats.

“I’d love to meet Frank Sinatra, but he’s no longer with us,” Raiola said.

Inspired by an eclectic of musical genres, the 2009 Detroit Lions Good Guy leaned towards the hip-hop scene for his ultimate collaboration.

“I’d love to see Drake and Kanye West,” Railoa said.

By Kevin Alan Lamb

Credit Eric Hampton

Kevin Alan Lamb joined the West Bloomfield High School varsity football team his junior year to avoid basketball conditioning. Despite no previous experience playing organized football, after one week of practice the 6-foot-7 230 pound junior was slotted to start both ways as a tight end and defensive end. Wear and tear of his throwing hand paired with little knowledge of what was going on made Lamb’s decision to hang up the cleats without ever playing a game an easy one.

Advertisements